Difference between revisions of "File talk:Global warming lastpolarbear.jpg"

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(Created page with "Image Copywrite Arne Naevra (Norway) See [http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit-us/whats-on/temporary-exhibitions/wpy/photo.do?photo=2268&category=52&group=3 National History Museum Lon...")
 
 
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''I was relaxing after a long day filming just east of Barentsöya Island, in Svalbard. Our boat was far from the nearest pack-ice or land, but just before midnight, an iceberg came into view with a strange cargo: a young polar bear. It swam away from its thawing life-raft, but the picture shows clearly how climate change is affecting the Arctic.' The polar bear is now officially endangered as the ice on which it hunts for food melts due to global warming. In 1996 the rate of loss was about 100 cubic kilometres per year. Ten years on, that loss has doubled. Pollution and the fact females only mate every two or three years add to the concerns.
 
''I was relaxing after a long day filming just east of Barentsöya Island, in Svalbard. Our boat was far from the nearest pack-ice or land, but just before midnight, an iceberg came into view with a strange cargo: a young polar bear. It swam away from its thawing life-raft, but the picture shows clearly how climate change is affecting the Arctic.' The polar bear is now officially endangered as the ice on which it hunts for food melts due to global warming. In 1996 the rate of loss was about 100 cubic kilometres per year. Ten years on, that loss has doubled. Pollution and the fact females only mate every two or three years add to the concerns.
 
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Nikon D2X with AF VR-Nikkor 80-400mm f4.5–5.6D lens at 310mm; 1/180 sec at f5.3; ISO 800.
 
Nikon D2X with AF VR-Nikkor 80-400mm f4.5–5.6D lens at 310mm; 1/180 sec at f5.3; ISO 800.

Latest revision as of 22:29, 16 January 2012

Image Copywrite Arne Naevra (Norway)

See National History Museum London

Polar meltdown

The comment there is

I was relaxing after a long day filming just east of Barentsöya Island, in Svalbard. Our boat was far from the nearest pack-ice or land, but just before midnight, an iceberg came into view with a strange cargo: a young polar bear. It swam away from its thawing life-raft, but the picture shows clearly how climate change is affecting the Arctic.' The polar bear is now officially endangered as the ice on which it hunts for food melts due to global warming. In 1996 the rate of loss was about 100 cubic kilometres per year. Ten years on, that loss has doubled. Pollution and the fact females only mate every two or three years add to the concerns.

Nikon D2X with AF VR-Nikkor 80-400mm f4.5–5.6D lens at 310mm; 1/180 sec at f5.3; ISO 800.